• Users Online: 462
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 

 Table of Contents  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 219-223

Consideration of influence of elementary teacher's personality behavior in creativity and innovation for the students of elementary schools in Semnan City


1 Lecturer Payame Noor University, Ceo and Executive Producer the Idea of Co-Axial Galaxy Learning CO. Semnan Province Science and Technology Park, Semnan, Iran
2 Semnan University Employee, Semnan, Iran

Date of Web Publication2-Sep-2016

Correspondence Address:
Seyedeh Elnaz Mostashiri
Lecturer Payame Noor University, Tehran
Iran
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2395-2296.189672

Rights and Permissions
  Abstract 

Aim: The aim of this research is to survey the private publications of elementary teachers in creating creativity and innovation for the students of elementary schools is Semnan Towns. Method of Research: The research utilized a descriptive – survey method, and to collect information from the survey methodology used cluster and probable method of sampling model is probability for teachers' and theirs student, in research used creativity model Torrance and five model personality factors Robert Mc Care and Paul Costain this research. Results: For data collection, a self-made scale was utilized it has been designed according to Likert scale. These questionnaires traditions confirmed by experts and the permanency are approved by Cronbach's alpha test 0.91 and 0.88 than The Pearson correlation test was used. The factor “neuroticism,” the teachers has the most connection with in students' flexibility extraversion and openness factors operating experience is more fluid relationship. Acclimation the most dutiful relationship with or are new initiatives. Conclusion: According to the results is recommended from increase creativity students on Teachers' Personality, on trainer's personality in the way of flexibility, innovation, freshness, and fluid have more accuracy.

Keywords: Creativity, education, personality


How to cite this article:
Mostashiri SE, Mostashiri N. Consideration of influence of elementary teacher's personality behavior in creativity and innovation for the students of elementary schools in Semnan City. Int J Educ Psychol Res 2016;2:219-23

How to cite this URL:
Mostashiri SE, Mostashiri N. Consideration of influence of elementary teacher's personality behavior in creativity and innovation for the students of elementary schools in Semnan City. Int J Educ Psychol Res [serial online] 2016 [cited 2019 Sep 16];2:219-23. Available from: http://www.ijeprjournal.org/text.asp?2016/2/4/219/189672


  Introduction Top


Although human civilization is the result of efforts of all men of all time, its richness and grandeur owes to a small group of people called discoverers, inventors, artists, or thinkers. From discovery of fire to the invention of radio and spaceships, from the wall paintings in caves to works of artists like Kamal-ol-Molk, and from the first writings to poems written by Ferdowsi are all products of collective ideas and works of a group of human beings. Human civilization owes to human's creative thought and its durability would be impossible without the use of creativity, which is the highest function of the human mind.[1] With the skill-based approach, we see a transmission of knowledge from the teacher to the student, i.e., there is a pattern of impartation, the teaching pattern meant to impart thinking skills (Harpaz), whereas thinking dispositions are taught by means of cultivation, a pattern intended to foster thinking dispositions.[2] The successful use of a teacher's personality is vital in conducting instructional activities. Personality aids teaching, for communication takes place between the teacher and the learner-even in the absence of the spoken word (nonverbal communication). The teacher whose personality helps create and preserve a classroom or learning environment in which students feel contented and in which they are provoked to learn is said to have an enviable teaching personality.[3] Therefore, the present study examines the influence of behavioral creativity of primary school teachers in creating innovation and creativity in students.

Different views and classifications are presented on human perspectives of personality. These views include the Five-factor model of personality by McCrae and Costa. This model divides human personality into five dimensions including the following: Openness to accepting new experiences, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism. According to this model, each individual can have specific attitudes and trends to tasks and objectives of the organization in terms of his/her personality traits.

However, in examining the factors which affect working behavior, other human factors such as compatibility with business activities and the work environment are essential to be noticed. However, if an individual has verbal abilities and motion skills, but his/her personality and his/her personality would not allow him/her to adapt the work, colleagues, clients, and other factors related to the work environment, he/she would not be able to do the job well.[4] Most of the research on personality focuses on the types of people who enter the teaching profession, rather than their effectiveness. Of the studies focusing on effectiveness, all use the teacher evaluation as the measure of effectiveness and nearly all focus on student–teachers. It stated that “good teachers” possess positive personality characteristics and interpersonal skills. It was further found that although “teachers” did not significantly differ on personality traits from the general population, there was a large and surprising amount of diversity in “teachers” personality characteristics when they are examined by sex, level of teaching service, and area of specialization within the profession.[5]

The importance of leader behaviors in the classroom is that teachers see themselves differently and thus behave differently owing to expanding their leadership roles.[6]

“The flourishing attention on creativity and its promotion in schools motivated many researchers to examine implicit and explicit theories to understand creativity.”[7] Explicit theories of researchers formulated, articulated, tested, and shared through their publications, contributed toward the clarification and the promotion of creativity in schools. On the other hand, implicit theories of lay people, parents, and teachers, which are based on their belief systems about creativity, played a critical role on the clarification of this phenomenon. Implicit theories about children's creativity and especially those of teachers are thought to be extremely important because they lead directly to expectations, and teachers' expectations are very powerful influences on students' behavior.[8]

A systematic analysis and synthesis of the existing literature on K-12 teachers' implicit theories, beliefs, or conceptions about creativity was carried out.[9]

It was revealed from the analysis that the majority of the studies explored one of the three aspects: (a) Creativity as a construct, (b) the profile of creative individuals, and (c) the creativity supportive classroom environment. The studies on teachers' implicit theories, beliefs, conceptions, or other related terms offered valuable conclusions about creativity and its promotion in schools; however, many of these studies revealed a misalignment between researchers' and teachers' views. Even though many studies exposed teachers' misconceptions or contradictions on creativity-related issues, there is a need for further research on educators' implicit theories, perceptions, and beliefs, considering the limited number of studies attempting to clarify them.[10]

Researchers have stressed the need for exploring teachers' implicit theories, perceptions, or other synonymous-related terms on creativity-related issues, especially in specific domains of knowledge.[9]

A number of studies have documented the efforts of educators to bring creativity into their classrooms.[11]

Creativity researchers have justified that creativity can be learned and taught through proper training programs with educators' conscious contributions and developing a creativity-friendly environment.[12] In line with this notion, some supporters suggest creative thinking should blend into the curricula and with a more pluralistic approach will assist students to increase the quantity and quality of ideas.[13] In education, the term “creativity” is often used but seldom defined. It is pointed out that teachers might ask students to use their creativity in the design of a project, or might refer to a student's response as creative, without explaining what they mean. A lack of definition of this concept might result in erroneous assumptions.[14]

The necessity and importance of research

Since the creation of creativity and innovation in students is essential who are the future managers, employees, and valuable human capital for countries, the influence of teachers on students, especially at the elementary school is an undeniable fact; the present paper confirms this subject.


  Research Method Top


This study is a descriptive-applied research and survey method is used to collect data. The first population included 897 elementary school teachers in Semnan Province. According to Morgan and Krejcie table, sample size is calculated to be 269 selected by cluster and random methods.

The second population consisted of students of those teachers. Of every teacher in the first sample, two or three students were selected randomly. The study uses Five-factor model of personality by McCrae and Costa and creativity model by Torrance.

To collect the required information, two researcher-made questionnaires were used in this study. Questionnaires were designed based on the Likert scale, with 5 levels very high, high, medium, low, and very low. The validity of the questionnaire was confirmed by professors and experts in the field of management, and then 20 copies of the questionnaires were used separately to test reliability. Cronbach's alpha to confirm the reliability in SPSS software, version 17 (IBM Company, USA) was 0.93 for teacher's questionnaire and 0.88 for student's questionnaire, which confirms the reliability. Data collection tool for teachers included a questionnaire that consisted of descriptive characteristics of teachers at the beginning and is followed by questions about the personality of students. The second questionnaire was distributed among 5 students per teacher from the first sample that were randomly selected. The Pearson correlation coefficient is used to study the influence of the behavior of elementary teachers on students' creativity and innovation.


  Results Top


In this part, the information and sorted test result are shown with table and charts.

[Figure 1] shows that the population included 897 persons, of which 689 were female and 208 were male.
Figure 1: Teachers' genders

Click here to view


[Figure 2] shows that teachers' level of education and most of teacher study in level of B.A., in university.
Figure 2: Teachers' level of education

Click here to view


According to the information obtained, the statistical distribution of the sample based on the experience of teachers is as shown in [Figure 3].
Figure 3: Teachers' working experience

Click here to view


[Table 1] is neuroticism of teachers; the Pearson correlation coefficient shows the following.
Table 1: The relationship between neuroticism of teachers and creativity components of students

Click here to view


The neuroticism in teachers has the strongest relationships with the flexibility of students, and the fluidity, innovation, and expansion are in the next ranks.

On extroversion of teachers, the Pearson correlation coefficient shows the following.

[Figure 1] shows that the extroversion in teachers has the strongest relationships with the fluidity of students, and the expansion, innovation, and flexibility are in the next ranks.

On agreeability of teachers, the Pearson correlation coefficient shows the following.

The agreeability in teachers has the strongest relationships with the innovation of students and the fluidity, expansion, and flexibility are in the next ranks that are shown in [Table 3].

On conscientiousness of teachers, the Pearson correlation coefficient shows the following.

[Table 4] shows the conscientiousness in teachers has the strongest relationships with the innovation of students and the expansion, flexibility, and fluidity are in the next ranks.

On openness of teachers, the Pearson correlation coefficient shows the following.

The openness in teachers has the strongest relationships with the fluidity of students and the flexibility, innovation, and expansion are in the next ranks.


  Conclusion Top


Research in the field of education, creativity, generally comes to the conclusion that creativity can be taught and developed.[15] Creativity can flourish by teachers on students has been or will be eliminated.[16] By providing psychological security and freedom, the possibility of the emergence of constructive creativity can be increased.[17] Torrance (1985) in his study concluded that the characteristics of the coach and his training methods may lead to an increase in creative thinking.[18] Arthur Catherine and Robert Bysand believe that teachers show their creative behavior, to create a classroom environment that promotes creativity.[19]

[Table 2] shows highest correlation with fluency and then by expansion, innovation and novelty and flexibility are important. [Table 5] shows the results show that the neuroticism in teachers has the strongest relationships with the flexibility of students, and the fluidity, innovation, and expansion are in the next ranks. The extroversion in teachers has the strongest relationships with the fluidity of students, and the expansion, innovation, and flexibility are in the next ranks. The agreeability in teachers has the strongest relationships with the innovation of students, and the fluidity, expansion, and flexibility are in the next ranks. The conscientiousness in teachers has the strongest relationships with the innovation of students, and the expansion, flexibility, and fluidity are in the next ranks. The openness in teachers has the strongest relationships with the fluidity of students, and the flexibility, innovation, and expansion are in the next ranks.
Table 2: The relationship between extroversion of teachers and creativity components of students

Click here to view
Table 3: The relationship between agreeability of teachers and creativity components of students

Click here to view
Table 4: The relationship between conscientiousness of teachers and creativity components of students

Click here to view
Table 5: The relationship between openness of teachers and creativity components of students

Click here to view


Other researchers have also recommended studying other ways to increase flexibility, innovation, or fluidity in behavior of teachers. It is also recommended to conduct the same research in other levels of education and compare the results with the present study and finally, it is recommended to consider the impact of culture as a moderating variable in future studies.

Acknowledgment

We are grateful to the support provided by the elementary school teachers in Semnan.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
Barat N. Creativity and learning in children. The Citizen Newspaper; 2003.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Yoram H. Approaches to Teaching thinking: A conceptual mapping of the field. Teach Coll Rec 2007;109:1845-74.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Callahan SG. Successful Teaching in Secondary Schools. Glenview, 111: Scott; 1996.   Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Khanifar H, Moghimi S, Jandaghi G, Taheri F, Sayyar A. Managers Personality Knowing Requisite for Management of Organizational Behavior (A Case Study of Five Factors Model of Personality in Qom University of Medical Sciences) Iran. J Health Administration 2009;12:49-56.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Getzels JW, Jackson PW. The teacher personality characteristic. In: Gage NL, editor. Handbook of Research on Teaching. Chicago: Rand McNally; 1963.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Searby L, Shaddix L. Growing teacher leaders in a culture of excellence. Prof Educ 2008;32:1-9.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Saracho O. Creativity theories and related teachers' beliefs. Early Child Dev Care 2012;182:35-44.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Runco MA. Creativity – Theories and Themes: Research, Development, and Practice. Burlington: Elsevier Academic Press; 2007.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.
Andiliou A, Murphy PK. Examining variations among researchers' and teachers' conceptualizations of creativity: A review and synthesis of contemporary research. Educ Res Rev 2010;5:201-19.  Back to cited text no. 9
    
10.
Kampylis P, Berki E, Saariluoma P. In-service and prospective teachers' conceptions of creativity. Think Skills Creat 2009;4:15-29.  Back to cited text no. 10
    
11.
Ng AK, Smith I. The paradox of promoting creativity in the Asian classroom: An empirical investigation. Genet Soc Gen Psychol Monogr 2004;130:307-30.  Back to cited text no. 11
    
12.
Davis GA. Gifted Children and Gifted Education: A Handbook for Teachers and Parents. Scottsdale, AZ: Great Potential Press; 2006.  Back to cited text no. 12
    
13.
Puccio GJ, Keller-Mathers S. Enhancing thinking and leadership skills through creative problem solving. In: Tan AG, editor. Creativity: A Handbook for Teachers. Hackensack, NJ: World Scientific; 2007. p. 281-301.  Back to cited text no. 13
    
14.
Beghetto RA. Does assessment kill student creativity? Educ Forum 2005;69:254-63.  Back to cited text no. 14
    
15.
Abedi J. Creativity and new ways of measuring it. J Psychological Res 1993;1:10.  Back to cited text no. 15
    
16.
Carl R. An Introduction to the man in the perspective of a practitioner of psychotherapy. Translation GHazi GHasem. Tehran: Islamic Azad University Press; 1990. p. 145.  Back to cited text no. 16
    
17.
Ali K. Dynamic Creative Child Magazine, Institute for the Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults, No. 5; 1976.  Back to cited text no. 17
    
18.
Ali K. Children's Creativity Dynamic Magazine, Institute for the Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults, No. 5; 1976.  Back to cited text no. 18
    
19.
David F. Psychology for Teachers. Translation Frvghan M. Tehran: Venerable Publication; 2003.  Back to cited text no. 19
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3]
 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2], [Table 3], [Table 4], [Table 5]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article
Abstract
Introduction
Research Method
Results
Conclusion
References
Article Figures
Article Tables

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1049    
    Printed31    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded136    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal


[TAG2]
[TAG3]
[TAG4]